cumantha:

florisms:

every day of my life

BUT ACTUALLY

(via horrorproportions)

thekhooll:

Earth at Night NASA

  • Montréal
  • New York City
  • Moscow
  • Rio de Janeiro
  • Brussels/Antwerp
  • New Orleans
  • New Delhi
  • Paris
  • Dubai
  • Italy

(Source: archatlas)

politicalprof:

Not everything in this is true, but it gets to the essence of the problem. From the Daily Mail.

(via hipsterlibertarian)

harvey-swick:

flowers-without-reason:

caesoxfan04:

Anderson Cooper saving a boy in Haiti during a shooting. A slab of concrete was dropped of the boys head.

Anderson fucking Cooper, everyone. 

Some journalists like to be strictly observers. they don’t intervene, they don’t participate. they just document what they see, even if what they see is terrible. But the way I see it, journalists don’t exist in a vacuum. They are human beings, living and working in a very human environment. And that humanity is essential in relating to their stories. When you lose your humanity, you lose any kind of journalistic integrity you have left. 

#nevernotreblog

(via daisymerollinjoints)

(Source: organiccats, via vi0lettae)

(via vi0lettae)

1337tattoos:

Olga Nekrasova

(via seidur)

hipsterlibertarian:

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unconsumption:

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blockquote>

No cardboard, no cellophane, no throwaway plastic trays, and no brands: Berlin’s newest supermarket is certainly a step away from the usual neighborhood grocery store.

Opened last Saturday, Original Unverpackt (the name translates to “Original Unpackaged”) is a novel shop in Berlin’s Kreuzberg neighborhood that has dispensed entirely with disposable packaging. Granted, the term “supermarket” might be a little grandiose for this small but tightly packed store, but the concept’s legs are as long as the store’s frontage is narrow.

Not only is a minimum-waste grocery store a canny business idea in a country that’s packed with green-conscious consumers, it’s also an interesting pilot project relevant to any city trying to cut their landfill and recycling burden.

 (via The Supermarket of the Future Has No Packaging - CityLab)